Court judges dabble in webcasts for judicial auctions

It’s common to see Chinese stars or Internet celebrities advertise products including clothing and cosmetics via live video streaming on e-commerce platforms, but can you believe that someone bought a house with a sea view via a webcast hosted by court judges?

On December 12, more than 8,000 netizens watched a special live broadcast on China’s largest e-commerce platform Taobao, an online auction held by Jin Shou and Cui Zhiyong, two court judges from Ningbo, Zhejiang province.

More than 8,000 netizens watched a special live broadcast on Taobao, an online auction held by Jin Shou and Cui Zhiyong, two court judges from Ningbo, Zhejiang province. (Screenshot from Taobao)

Instead of selling clothes or cosmetics, Jin and Cui offered over 50 items from all over the country, including a house with a sea view located in Qingdao, Shandong province, a small forest in Anhui province, parking lots and cell phone numbers considered to bring good luck.

A total of 34 items were sold during the event, which lasted just over an hour, with transactions exceeding 100 million yuan.

While introducing the products, the judges also answered questions and simplified judicial knowledge for viewers. For example, the hosts said if a person bids for the items yet fails to make the final payment, the judicial organ will confiscate his deposit and forbid him from bidding on the item again in the future.

About 99 percent of courts in China have opened online shops for judicial auctions. By December 12, 2019, Chinese courts had sold 465,842 items through online platforms, with transactions reaching around 987.5 billion yuan.